It’s Uncomplicated Part 1

How to Simplify Your Home

In our current Western society, the pursuit of economic wealth and status often centers around an accumulation of material possessions – “stuff”. Media outlets perpetuate a pervasive belief that more stuff equals success and validation.

However, rather than feel accomplished and at peace, striving to have more stuff comes at the expense of our freedom – the freedom to live purpose-driven, healthy lives.

That’s not to say that the desire to own stuff is inherently bad. When the pressure to amass more and more stuff outweighs nurturing healthy relationships with ourselves and others, the resulting low vibration can disrupt personal growth and serenity.

I’m not suggesting that you should go out and get rid of all of your stuff. On the contrary, what I do recommend is that we change our relationship with “stuff”, that we shift focus and prioritize experiences over gadgets and owning more than we need.

In my new series, It’s Uncomplicated, we’ll look at several ways to live a simplified, less complicated lifestyle – in our homes and with our health and wellness plans.

Lifestyle Changes that Benefit Our Home, Health and the Environment

Minimalism is a tool to rid yourself of life’s excess in favor of focusing on what’s important—so you can find happiness, fulfillment, and freedom. – The Minimalist

It is possible to live a happy and fulfilled life with less stuff in your home – less can be more.

● More time. Owning less means less cleaning, giving you more time to focus on other more important things.
● More mental energy. A cluttered home contributes to distraction and anxiety. Less stuff, less clutter, less distraction.
● More money. Investing in moments rather than unnecessary spending keeps money in your pocket.
● More harmony. Intentional and mindful consumption increases harmony in your life.

A zero-waste lifestyle takes minimalism to another level, as in the example of Kathryn Kellogg, who successfully downsized her two-year trash pile to literally fit inside one 16-ounce jar.

“Zero-waste is really about trying to minimize your trash and making better choices in your life.”

The US is a prime contributor of trash, producing nearly 250 million tons per year – that’s roughly 4.4 pounds of trash per person per day. We can do better.

Most of our trash waste, about 3.5 million tons is single-use plastic. Consider that adopting a zero-to-low plastic habit will go a long way to help ease our trash pollution problem which in turn helps the planet and also fits nicely with owning less stuff.

Here are a few uncomplicated ways to ditch single-use plastic:

1. Purchase fresh salad greens rather than those sold in plastic bags. Better yet, grow your own.
2. Instead of going out for expensive coffee drinks brew your own at home. If you can’t resist splurging at your nearest Starbucks, bring your own reusable cup.
3. Consider using bar soap instead of bottled soft soap.
4. Refuse plastic straws and bring your own metal or silicone versions.

There are countless ways to swap conventional plastic items for zero waste options and most are very uncomplicated.

Choosing to adopt a mindful and intentional relationship with stuff will greatly reduce stress and anxiety while also benefiting our environment. Simplify, reduce, swap, and refocus on quality of life versus quantity of possessions. It doesn’t have to be complicated.

Next, in the It’s Uncomplicated series, we’ll examine how to uncomplicate what and how we eat for better health.

Sound Technology for Balanced Living

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